George Clooney Had to 'Wait 28 minutes' for Amal Alamuddin to Say Yes

George Clooney Had to 'Wait 28 minutes' for Amal Alamuddin to Say Yes
George Clooney has described for the first time how a shocked Amal Alamuddin kept him waiting on bended knee after his marriage proposal took her by surprise.
 
In an interview with CBS News, he joked that she kept him hanging on for 28 minutes before saying yes.
 
"I knew fairly quickly that I wanted to spend the rest of my life with Amal (but) we had never talked about it so there wasn’t like a 'Hey, maybe we should get married,’" he said.
 
"Literally, I dropped it on her. And she just kept saying, ‘Oh my god,’ and 'Wow' - completely unexpected."
 
Mr Clooney added: "We just sat there and finally I said, ‘Listen, I’m 52 and I’ve been on my knee now for about 28 minutes, so I gotta get an answer out of this or I'm going to throw a hip out. I might not be able to stand back up.'"
 
The actor proposed at his home in Los Angeles to the backdrop of music by his aunt, Rosemary Clooney, the 1950s cabaret singer who starred with Bing Crosby in White Christmas.
 
He said “I was at my home and I queued up a playlist of some of my aunt Rosemary’s songs."
 
Mr Clooney, who stars in the upcoming science fiction adventure filmTomorrowland, has spoken extensively recently about his marriage to the 37-year-old human rights lawyer.
 
He told CBS: "I’ve got a real decision maker, a much smarter decision maker. I have someone I can talk to about anything, and someone who I care more about then I’ve cared about anybody. So it’s really nice.”
 
Mr Clooney told access Hollywood: "I knew when I met her that she was super¬extraordinary. I wondered if I would ever get a chance to date her. We were friends for a while and luckily she said yes."
 
The actor also said he wanted to spend more time behind the camera over the course of the rest of his career.
 
He said: "I think that’s just a natural progression for actors as they age. It’s not much fun aging on camera.
 
"I'm much more interested in the process of film-making than I am necessarily being in front of the camera."
 

Source: Telegraph